The Ten Laws of Influence

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TEN LAWS OF INFLUENCE

Each of us is subjected to hundreds if not thousands of influence attempts every day.  We talk to others, we see other people, we read books, watch television or listen to the radio, see or hear advertisements, read newspapers or magazines, open emails, read texts, participate in meetings, work with people, and so on.  We may be influenced by people we see, talk to, meet with, or read about--or we may not.  An important part of the human experience is deciding (mostly subconsciously) whether to be influenced by something we experience.  

Trying to influence others is sometimes easy and sometimes not, depending on the person, the context, and the circumstances.  Below are ten laws of influence.  Understanding these laws will make you more effective at influencing more people more often.

1

Influence attempts may fail for many legitimate reasons

 

2

Influence is contextual

3

Influence is often a process rather than an event

4

Influence is cultural

7

People respond best to the influence techniques they use themselves

5

Ethical influence is consensual and often bilateral

8

If you are observant, people will reveal what they find most influential

6

Unethical influence may succeed--but always at a cost

9

Influence usually involves a mix of techniques

10

The more power you have, the more influential you will be

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Learn & understand key principles to successful influencing